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A Little Practice Goes a Long Way

Post by: Chase Hilderbrandt

Imagine if you only brushed your teeth one day a week for one full hour. Would your teeth be as clean as they’d be if you stuck to your normal routine? Now, imagine if you only practice your instrument for one hour, one day a week. Do you think it’d be just as productive as if you spread that hour throughout the week? The problem with those routines is that they lack consistency, and you might find yourself progressing slowly through your drum lessons, or any music lessons. The key here is to develop a practice routine that is consistent. Practicing ten minutes every day will help speed up your progress, rather than cramming a long practice session into one day: a little goes a long way!

Musician and educator Ian R. says, “Consistent practice will help you to retain information that you have learned during your lessons. When you have a practice session, your brain will process the information and remember it more efficiently the next time you practice. Practicing consistently actually helps to develop areas of your brain.” This is especially important during the first couple days following your lesson. For example, if you wait three to days after your lesson to practice, your brain will have most likely forgotten some details and feedback your music teacher gave you. Practicing a little bit everyday - even the day of your lesson - will help you grow faster as a musician and performer.

When I was taking drum lessons, I would always practice immediately after my lesson and write down feedback that my drum teacher gave me. Once I switched over to this routine, I noticed my progress in music lessons was moving at a quicker pace, and I felt more prepared going into my lessons. Before I switched to this routine, my practicing was inconsistent and unstable which enabled me to become unmotivated at times to practice.

Every practice routine should be personalized to the growth and needs of each student. Do you have a consistent practice routine? If so, could you write it down? Talk to your teacher next lesson about what a practice routine should like for you. Check out the articles below to explore more ideas about how consistent practice is linked to more success and growth.

The Power of Consistent Practice by Jermaine Griggs 
The Importance of a Consistent Practice Routine by Ian R.


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